eLetters

3 e-Letters

published between 2016 and 2019

  • Hyperbaric oxygen treatment can be an early adjunctive therapy in sudden deafness

    We read with interest the article by Bayoumy et al. concerning the effects of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) associated with corticosteroid therapy in military personnel with acute acoustic trauma1. This paper helps to discuss about the most appropriate treatment of sudden deafness (SD). As recently stated, a spontaneous recovery, in the general population, is less than 40%. The precise role of HBOT has not yet been clearly established2. Our clinical experience during the last 15 years in a second referral hyperbaric center indicates the need of clear guide-lines, for the treatment of this acute disease. Nowadays there are two main therapeutic approaches to SD of different origin, the corticosteroid medication and HBOT.
    Clearly, at first, it has to be ascertained the nature of a deafness excluding, cerebral diseases, vascular, traumatic and neoplastic. A subsequent otolaryngology evaluation enables to ascertain possible associated vestibular diseases, and to measure Pure Tone Average. Medical contraindications to HBOT and corticosteroids medication have to be excluded. An early treatment, not beyond the first 48 hours after the acute event is recommended 1. Today the HBOT standardized protocol, consists in a daily oxygen 100% at 2.2-2.5 atmosphere for 90 minutes, for a minimum of 10 sessions in case of satisfying functional recovery. On the contrary, in case of absolutely negative results, the treatment should be interrupted. Otherwise, HBOT can be prolonged to a...

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  • Penthrox for the military: Possilbly, but you need to understand what you are using

    The article by Cohen and Wolstenholme provides a useful overview of Penthrox but is unfortunately incomplete.

    Compared with modern anaesthetic agents, Penthrox is an unclean drug and would not get a product license if invented today. The high fat solubility means a tissue reservoir persists for ≈1 week. About 70% is biotransformed, and this continues after administration until the tissue reservoir is empty. Nephrotoxicity was not just “a concern” but actually happened; ≈20 people died [1].

    It has only been possible to use Penthrox 5 million times safely because of essential pre-use checks to ensure no contraindications. It is worth remembering that methoxyflurane was used 10-12 million times before the nephrotoxic potential was established [1].

    Penthrox produces nephrotoxic metabolites at all doses, but this only becomes clinically significant above a certain level. The claim that Penthrox use is not nephrotoxic is technically correct, however, the presence of other factors that can also induce renal injury will reduce the Penthrox safety net. Of relevance to military use, this includes crush injury, hypovolaemic shock and patients subsequently requiring nephrotoxic antibiotics. Other potential issues for military use: (1) Limit to ≈50min administration (two bottles); (2) Activated charcoal adsorber is only effective IF the patient exhales through it. The patient will continue to exhale small amounts of drug for hours after administration; (3) There i...

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  • Critical Care Air Transport Team and traumatic brain injury

    Critical Care Air Transport Team and traumatic brain injury
    Viroj Wiwanitkit1
    1. Hainan Medical University, China
    Correspondence
    Professor Viroj Wiwanitkit
    Email: wviroj@yahoo.com

    I read this article on the "Critical Care Air Transport Team and traumatic brain injury" with a great interest [1]. Boyd et al. noted that "Air transport personnel must be prepared to provide standard critical care but also care specific to TBIs, including ICP control and management of diabetes insipidus. Although these patients and their potential complications are traditionally managed by neurosurgeons, those providers without neurosurgical backgrounds can be provided this training to help fill a wartime need." I agree that in the critical situation and resource limited (such as remote area or war zone), the use of available facilities and personnel is better than doing nothing or waiting for the specialty. For the military clinical practice, the question is on the skill of the medical military personnel. There should a specific training for any medical military personnel on this specific subject, which is different from non-military ones. Another interesting question that I and many readers might want to know is on the safety management of the medical personnel and military team in the war zone. The summary of experience on self-protection during caring the others will be a useful data. Referring...

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