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Psychology, risk, health and deployed military operations
  1. Neil Verrall
  1. Human and Social Science Group, Defence Science and Technology Laboratory, Salisbury SP4 0JQ, UK
  1. Correspondence to Neil Verrall, Human and Social Science Group, Defence Science and Technology Laboratory, Salisbury SP4 0JQ, UK; ngverrall{at}dstl.gov.uk

Abstract

This article will focus on a study by the UK Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (Dstl) which investigated the risk propensity and health behaviours of UK army personnel deployed to Iraq in 2007 as part of Op TELIC. The study addressed the concept of impulsive sensation seeking and how this interacted with health behaviours associated with alcohol, smoking, driving and sex at predeployment, during deployment and postdeployment, as well as perceptions of risk and psychological well-being. There is also a description of other deployment-related risk and health research and analysis undertaken by Dstl as part of a wider discussion on the nature of both risk and health on deployed operations.

  • psychology
  • military
  • health

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Footnotes

  • Correction notice This article has been corrected since it was published Online First. The copyright license was changed and the article was made Open Access.

  • Contributors NV is the sole author and contributor.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient consent Obtained.

  • Ethics approval MOD Research Ethics Committee.

  • Provenance and peer review Commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

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