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Critical Care Air Transport Team severe traumatic brain injury short-term outcomes during flight for Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom
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    Critical Care Air Transport Team and traumatic brain injury

    Critical Care Air Transport Team and traumatic brain injury
    Viroj Wiwanitkit1
    1. Hainan Medical University, China
    Correspondence
    Professor Viroj Wiwanitkit
    Email: wviroj@yahoo.com

    I read this article on the "Critical Care Air Transport Team and traumatic brain injury" with a great interest [1]. Boyd et al. noted that "Air transport personnel must be prepared to provide standard critical care but also care specific to TBIs, including ICP control and management of diabetes insipidus. Although these patients and their potential complications are traditionally managed by neurosurgeons, those providers without neurosurgical backgrounds can be provided this training to help fill a wartime need." I agree that in the critical situation and resource limited (such as remote area or war zone), the use of available facilities and personnel is better than doing nothing or waiting for the specialty. For the military clinical practice, the question is on the skill of the medical military personnel. There should a specific training for any medical military personnel on this specific subject, which is different from non-military ones. Another interesting question that I and many readers might want to know is on the safety management of the medical personnel and military team in the war zone. The summary of experience on self-protection during caring the others will be a useful data. Referring...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.