Article Text

PDF
Modelling for conflict: the legacy of ballistic research and current extremity in vivo modelling
  1. William G P Eardley1,
  2. S A Watts2 and
  3. J C Clasper1
  1. 1Academic Department of Military Surgery and Trauma, Royal Centre for Defence Medicine, ICT Centre, Institute of Research and Development, Birmingham, UK
  2. 2Defence Science and Technology Laboratory, Salisbury, Wiltshire, UK
  1. Correspondence to W G P Eardley, Academic Department of Military Surgery and Trauma, Royal Centre for Defence Medicine, ICT Centre, Institute of Research and Development, Birmingham Research Park, Vincent Drive, Birmingham B15 2SQ, UK; willeardley{at}doctors.org.uk

Abstract

Extremity ballistic injury is unique and the literature intended to guide its management is commonly misinterpreted. In order to care for those injured in conflict and conduct appropriate research, clinicians must be able to identify key in vivo studies, understand their weaknesses and desist the propagation of miscited and misunderstood ballistic dogma. This review provides the only inclusive critical overview of key studies of relevance to military extremity injury. In addition, the non-ballistic studies of limb injury, stabilisation and contamination that will form the basis from which future small animal extremity studies are constructed are presented. With an awareness of the legacy of military wound models and an insight into available generic models of extremity injury and contamination, research teams are well placed to optimise future military extremity injury management.

Statistics from Altmetric.com

  • Received March 19, 2013.
  • Accepted March 21, 2013.
View Full Text

Request permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.