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Operational medical force protection: the collective solution
  1. C D Bonser1 and
  2. J R Fawcett2
  1. 1SO2 Medical Intelligence, J4 Medical, Primary Joint Headquarters formerly SO2 Medical Force Protection, Headquarters Joint Forces Support (Afghanistan), Operation HERRICK 13B-14A
  2. 2SO2 Medical Force Protection, Medical Branch, Headquarters 1st (United Kingdom) Armoured Division formerly SO2 Medical Force Protection, Headquarters Joint Force Support (Afghanistan), Operation HERRICK 11B-12A, UK
  1. Correspondence to Major J R Fawcett, RAMC, SO2 Medical Force Protection, Medical Branch, Headquarters 1st (United Kingdom) Armoured Division, Wentworth Barracks, BFPO 15, UK;1ukxx-med-intfp-so2{at}mod.uk

Abstract

Disease and non-battle injury have historically caused greater morbidity and mortality than battle trauma during military operations, and continue to do so. As a countermeasure, medical force protection (Med FP) measures will assist in the maintenance of combat efficiency, reducing manpower wastage and the inherent consumption of medical, infrastructural and logistical resources at the tactical, operational and strategic levels. This paper considers recent improvements in provision and delivery of essential Med FP measures and outlines the effect and confounding factors associated with pragmatic Med FP delivery across the Task Force Helmand area of responsibility during Op HERRICK 11B-14A (January 2010–July 2011) in Afghanistan, with a particular focus on military environmental health assets.

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